This Week’s Links: Hats, Fonts, Art, and More

A couple of years ago Andrew Castle, a 9yo homeschooler, began a charity raising money for Heifer International by selling handknitted hats. Now he sells both handknitted hats (donations accepted) and baseball caps, and his charity, Hats for Hunger, donates all the proceeds. Each year he’s increased his donation; in 2010 he donated $5000! And that’s not all — Hats for Hunger has also donated hats to homeless shelters, including shelters serving pregnant women and newborns.

Andrew’s goal for this year is a $10,000 donation. Click on his website to find out how to donate a hat, donate money, or buy a very cool hat made by a volunteer knitter. You can also follow Hats for Hunger on Facebook.

Violet is ever more interested in art, which thrills me, because I cannot draw a recognizable stick person. Just in time for it to end, I learned about a series of columns on drawing in the New York Times and thought it was worth adding to the resource list. Line by Line, a 12-column series, is written by James Mc Mullan, an illustrator. It is great reading for someone like me, too, who probably cannot draw because I cannot see the way my daughter and other artist-types do. I don’t care if I ever learn to draw, but I love learning to see (and hear and feel) with greater sensitivity. Keeps me from pulling up roots and moving completely into the studio apartment of my mind.

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We have wondered about both girls whether they might have ADHD. Perhaps they do. Hearing from adults whose lives were transformed by ADHD medication makes it impossible for me to consider ADHD as merely a “school environment” problem. But sometimes it is — Peter Gray has solicited and collected a variety of stories of kids labeled ADHD who did not have the same problems when they began to homeschool.

I have always thought Comic Sans a bourgeois, anti-intellectual font, but until now I’d never have confessed it. I’ve always considered that very thought shamefully pretentious, even more so when I found it exposed and mocked online. And on McSweeney’s no less.

I’d like to quote from it, but Comic Sans swears. A lot. But in a good way.

Which reminds me, I spent Christmas with my extended family/dad’s side for the first time in several years. I’m the one standing next to the tall bald guy, in the back.

1Family

Look how normal we all turned out!

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2 Comments

Filed under Family Fun, In the News, Learning Styles

2 responses to “This Week’s Links: Hats, Fonts, Art, and More

  1. Mariposa

    I read that article about ADHD. DD has a dx, but we did a program that involves specialized computer programs. When completed her TOVA score was barely out of range instead of definitively impulsive type.

    I do not think homeschool alleviates the issue; we accommodate. School is just not set up to handle a student like this.

    The impulse behavior has decreased, but her executive functioning I think is not where it should be. Of course there is a huge divide as to what kind of academic work she can do versus an average kid, and I don’t know how much, if any, is attributable to this. I do know we spend a lot of time looking for lost books and papers for outside.

    When I was my daughter’s age my parents would never have had to remind me. On the other hand, my spouse cannot remember being responsible until high school. He came from a family with two children, whereas I came from a family of eleven and that may make a difference.

  2. We have found great improvements with a change in my son’s diet – maybe part of the school to homeschool equation is cutting out the school lunch? Hmmm….

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